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Young Soo Cho 2 Articles
Associations between Early Hyperoxia and Long Term Neurologic Outcome in Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Ju Chan Kim, Byeong Jo Chun, Jeong Mi Moon, Young Soo Cho
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2020;18(1):18-25.   Published online June 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22537/jksct.2020.18.1.18
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Purpose: We studied the impact of arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) on the long term neurologic outcome in patients with acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Methods: The study population included 311 patients who presented to emergency department with acute CO poisoning from January 2015 to January 2018. These patients underwent arterial blood gas testing at the time of presentation. The baseline demographic, clinical, laboratory, and clinical outcome data were recorded. The primary outcome of interest was the long term neurologic status. Results: The normoxia group was significantly older and it had a higher incidence of diffusion weighted MRI abnormality, and this group needed multiple HBO sessions compared to the group with moderate or severe hyperoxia. Also, the incidence of altered mentality at discharge was higher in the normoxia group than that of the moderate hyperoxia group. The incidence of a poor long term neurologic outcome was 11.3%. The incidence of a poor long term neurologic outcome decreased as the PaO2 increased. The PaO2 was significantly lower in patients with a poor long term neurologic outcome than that of the patients with a good outcome 198 (165.2 to 231.1) mmHg in the good outcome group vs. 154 (119-162) mmHg in poor outcome, p<0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, PaO2 was selected as an independent factor of the poor long-term neurologic outcome (OR 0.981 (95% CI: 0.968 to 0.995)) Conclusion: Higher PaO2 was independently associated with a lower incidence of a poor long-term neurologic outcome.
PaCO2 at Early Stage is Associated with Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Keun Mo Yang, Byeong Jo Chun, Jeong Mi Moon, Young Soo Cho
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2019;17(2):86-93.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22537/jksct.2019.17.2.86
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Purpose: The objective was to determine the association between PaCO2 and adverse cardiovascular events (ACVEs) in carbon monoxide (CO)-poisoned patients. Methods: This retrospective study included 194 self-breathing patients after CO poisoning with an indication for hyperbaric oxygen therapy and available arterial blood gas analysis at presentation and 6 hours later. The baseline characteristics and clinical course during hospitalization were collected and compared. The mean PaCO2 during the first 6 hours after presentation was calculated. Results: The incidence rates of moderate (30 mmHg< PaCO2 <35 mmHg) or severe (PaCO2 ≤30 mmHg) hypocapnia at presentation after acute CO poisoning were 40.7% and 26.8%, respectively. The mean PaCO2 during the first 6 hours was 33 (31-36.7) mmHg. The incidence of ACVEs during hospitalization was 50.5%. A significant linear trend in the incidence of ACVEs was observed across the total ranges of PaCO2 variables. In multivariate regression analysis, mean PaCO2 was independently associated with ACVEs (OR 0.798 (95% CI 0.641-0.997)). Conclusion: Mean PaCO2 during the first 6 hours was associated with increased ACVEs. Given the high incidence of ACVEs and PaCO2 derangement and the observed association between PaCO2 and ACVEs, this study suggests that 1) PaCO2 should be monitored at the acute stage to predict and/or prevent ACVEs; and 2) further study is needed to validate this result and investigate early manipulation of PaCO2 as treatment.

JKSCT : Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology