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Su Ik Kim 2 Articles
Clinical Analysis of Acute Endosulfan Poisoning: Single Center Experience
So Eun Kim, Su Ik Kim, Jae Baek Lee, Young Ho Jin, Tae Oh Jeong, Si On Jo, Jae Chol Yoon
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2015;13(2):71-77.   Published online December 31, 2015
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Purpose: Acute endosulfan poisoning is rare but causes significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of our study is to describe complications and features of seizure and determine factors associated with mortality in acute endosulfan poisoning. Methods: Twenty-eight adult patients with acute endosulfan poisoning admitted to our emergency department during a 15-year period were studied retrospectively. The clinical features of seizure, use of antiepileptic drugs during seizure, and hospital courses were evaluated. Clinical factors between survived group and non-survived group were compared for identification of factors associated with mortality. Results: Of the 28 patients with endosulfan poisoning, 4 patients (14.3%) died and 15 (53.6%) patients developed generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Thirteen patients (46.4%) and 5 patients (17.9%) progressed to status epilepticus (SE) and refractory status epilepticus (RSE), respectively. SE and RSE were associated with mortality. Almost all significant complications including shock, acute renal failure, hepatic toxicity, rhabdomyolysis, and cardiac injury developed in SE and RSE patients. Conclusion: SE and RSE were important contributors to death in endosulfan poisoning. Emergency physicians treating endosulfan poisoning should make an effort not to progress seizure following endosulfan poisoning to SE and RSE using a rapid and aggressive antiepileptic drug.
Measurement of Volume of a Swallow for Liquid Swallowing in Healthy Young Adults
Su Ik Kim, Ji Hun Kang, Dong Ik Lee, Jeong Ryul Jo, Hyung Jun Kim, Jae Baek Lee, Young Ho Jin, Tae Oh Jeong, Jae Chol Yoon
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2013;11(2):114-118.   Published online December 31, 2013
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Purpose: The aim of this study is to estimate one mouthful volume in a single swallow and average volume per swallow (AVS) in multiple swallows in the situation of toxic liquid poisoning. Methods: Thirty five men and 35 women were included in this study. Each subject was asked to drink one swallow and three consecutive swallows from bottle containing water and a bottle containing saline separately. We calculated one mouthful volume in a single swallow and AVS in three swallows. One mouthful volume and AVS were compared according to sex and content, respectively. One mouthful volume of water and saline was then compared with AVS of each. Results: Sixty seven adults(34 men; $26.9{pm}3.2$ years, 33 women; $25.6{pm}2.4$ years) completed the study. Men had larger one mouthful volume of water($49.1{pm}19.9$ ml vs $39.7{pm}10.2$ ml, p=0.02) and saline($20.7{pm}10.9$ ml vs $14.0{pm}4.6$ ml, p=0.004) and AVS of water($28.5{pm}11.9$ ml vs $21.5{pm}5.9$ ml, p=0.004) and saline($11.9{pm}6.3$ ml vs $7.9{pm}2.0$ ml, p=0.001) than women. One mouthful volume and AVS of saline swallow were lower than those of water swallow. AVS of three consecutive swallows was lower than one mouthful volume in water and saline swallow. Conclusion: We suggest that one mouthful volume in a single swallow is 21 ml in men and 14 ml in women and AVS in multiple swallows is 12 ml in men and 8 ml in women. AVS in multiple swallows is two-threefold lower than reference values(20~30 ml) commonly used in poisoning study.

JKSCT : Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology