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Jae-Cheon Jeon 4 Articles
Predicting Factors Associated with Large Amounts of Glyphosate Intoxication in the Early-Stage Emergency Department: QTc Interval Prolongation
Dong-Soo Kyung, Jae-Cheon Jeon, Woo Ik Choi, Sang-Hun Lee
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2020;18(2):130-135.   Published online December 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22537/jksct.2020.18.2.130
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Purpose: Taking large amounts of glyphosate is life-threatening, but the amounts of glyphosate taken by patients for suicide are not known precisely. The purpose of this study was to find the predictors of large amounts of glyphosate ingestion. Methods: This retrospective study analyzed patients presenting to an emergency department with glyphosate intoxication between 2010 and 2019, in a single tertiary hospital. The variables associated with the intake amounts were investigated. The parameters were analyzed by multivariate variate logistic regression analyses and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: Of the 28 patients with glyphosate intoxication, 15 (53.6%) were in the large amounts group. Univariate analysis showed that metabolic acidosis, lactic acid, and corrected QT (QTc) interval were significant factors. In contrast, multivariate analysis presented the QTc interval as the only independent factor with intoxication from large amounts of glyphosate. (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 1.073, 1.011-1.139; p=0.020) The area under the ROC curve of the QTc interval was 0.838. Conclusion: The QTc interval is associated significantly with patients who visit the emergency department after being intoxicated by large amounts of glyphosate. These conclusions will help in the initial triage of patients with glyphosate intoxication.
Respiratory Failure following Tetramine poisoning after Ingestion of Sea Snail: A Case Report
Joo Hwan Lee, Jin Wook Park, Seong Jun Hong, Jae-Cheon Jeon, Sang-Chan Jin
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2020;18(1):42-46.   Published online June 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22537/jksct.2020.18.1.42
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Tetramine toxicity due to sea snail ingestion is generally mild and has a good prognosis. Tetramine toxicity acts on the acetylcholine receptor, affecting the neuromuscular junction and autonomic nervous system. A 78-year-old female patient visited the emergency room with vomiting and dyspnea after eating sea snails. At the time of admission, the vital signs recorded were 140/80 mmHg-105/min-24/min-36.5℃, and 90% oxygen saturation. Arterial blood test revealed hypercapnia (pCO2 58.2 mmHg) and respiratory acidosis (pH 7.213, HCO3- 22.5 mmol/L), whereas other blood tests showed no specific findings. Due to decreased consciousness and hypoxia, endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation were administered to the patient. Successful weaning was accomplished after 12 hrs, and the patient was discharged without any further complications. Although tetramine toxicity rarely results in acute respiratory failure due to paralysis of the respiratory muscle, caution is required whilst treating the patient.
Relation of First Aid associated with Complications after Snake Bites
Jae-Cheon Jeon, Dong-Ha Lee, Geun-Yong Kwon, Sung-Jin Kim
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2009;7(2):105-112.   Published online December 31, 2009
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Purpose: There have been local wound complications in patients who have received first aid after venomous snake bites. Yet first aid in relation to local wound complications has not been well studied. Methods: We conducted a 5-year retrospective study of 111 snake bite patients who visited the emergency departments of several medical centers between January 2004 and December 2008. We categorized the patients into those who had complications with inadequate first aid, those who had complications without first aid those who had complications with adequate first aid. We compared the genera characteristics and the laboratory and clinical findings of the three groups. Results: The ale o female ratio was 1.36. The most common bite site was fingers. The most common systemic symptom was dizziness (6.3%) and the most common complication was rhabdomyolysis (23.4%). The inadequate first aids group had more local complications (cellulitis, skin necrosis) than did the group with adequate first aid or the group with no first aids. Conclusion: Inadequate first aid after snake bite leads to local complications, so we must be careful to administer first aid after snake bite and evaluate this first aid in elation to local complications.
Risk Factors Associated with Complications of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Sung-Won Jang, Jae-Cheon Jeon, Woo-Ik Choi
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2009;7(1):10-18.   Published online June 30, 2009
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Purpose: Carbon Monoxide Poisoning is an important medical emergency in Korea, but the factors leading to its serious manifestation are not well studied. Methods: We conducted a 5-year retrospective study of 98 carbon monoxide poisoned patients who visited the emergency departments of the Medical Center between December 2004 and March 2009. We categorized the patients into those exhibiting only local symptoms (group 1) and those showing systemic symptoms and complications (group 2). We compared the general characteristics as well as the clinical and laboratory findings between both groups. Results: The male to female ratio was 1.18. The most common systemic symptom was a mental change (43.9%), while the most common complication was rhabdomyolysis (31.6%). Poisoned area closed private room in group 2 were 23 (41.8%) cases and burning region in group 2 were 16(29.1%) cases (p=0.956). Individuals who were accidentally poisoned comprised of 43 (78.2%) cases while those that attempted suicidal poisoning comprised 12 (21.8%) cases (p=0.016). The most common symptom at arrival was mental change 33 (60.0%) cases in group 2. The mean time exposed to carbon monoxide was 43$pm$3.97 hours in group 1 and 55$pm$10.11 in group 2 (p=0.012). The patient's age, context of poisoning, symptom at arrival, and time exposed to the poison were found to be significant risk factors for complications by logistic regression analysis. Conclusion: Carbon monoxide poisoning is an emergency medical condition and the risk factors involved in the development of serious complications must be evaluated.

JKSCT : Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology